INTERVIEWS, ARTICLES, ESSAYS

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Touching Enlightenment

Touching Enlightenment

Tricycle, Spring 2006 After years of meditation, you may feel you’re making very little progress. But the guide you may...

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The Awakened State

The Awakened State

In this episode, Tami Simon from Sounds True  speaks with Reggie about the possibility of using modern methods for...

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In a word, Dharma

In a word, Dharma

What is Dharma? According to Reginald A. Ray, dharma is a fascinating term because it integrates several levels of experience, from our first moment on the path to the achievement of full realization.

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Hard Questions

Hard Questions

Interview with Reggie Ray Sounds True: Insights at the Edge, August 2009 In this episode of Insights at the Edge, Tami...

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Busyness is Laziness. ~ Dr. Reggie Ray Sept. 2, 2008

Busyness is Laziness. ~ Dr. Reggie Ray Sept. 2, 2008

The life that we have in our mind, the life that is a reflection of our planning, the life that has been constructed out of bits and pieces in our environment—external conditioning, things we have observed in other people, things that influential people have told us—is actually not who we are.

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And Sparks will Fly

And Sparks will Fly

Dr. Reggie Ray is one of the first examples of an historical synthesis: the wisdom of the East and the technological know-how of the West. That’s not just hype: until 1959, when the Reds rolled through Tibet, Buddhism was something you read about in National Geographic. Then, suddenly, in a diaspora equal to the genocide that caused it, 2,500 years of Buddhist wisdom found itself forcibly exported across the snowy Himalayas. Chögyam Trungpa was perhaps foremost among these Tibetan gurus—leaving behind his monk’s robes for suits & sake, he put his ancient tradition into terms accessible and relevant to a new America. Among his first students was a young, precocious scholar by the name of Reggie Ray. 30 years later, Dr. Ray is an Acharya—an honorific similar to ‘Master’ or ‘Roshi’—and, with Pema Chödron, one of the best in the West at communicating the everyday profundity of the East.

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The Three Lineages

The Three Lineages

Inspiration, innovation, institution—Reginald A. Ray looks at the different manifestations of lineage and how they maintain their awakened quality.

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Playing with Fire

Playing with Fire

Tibetan Buddhism contains many teachings about the subtle energies of the body that are focused on the chakras or energy centers. Tibetan Buddhist scholar and meditation teacher Reginald Ray told Dharma Life about the dangers of meditating on the chakras.

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Three in One: A Buddhist Trinity

Three in One: A Buddhist Trinity

The “three bodies of the Buddha” may seem like a remote construct, says Reginald Ray, but they are the ground of existence and present in every moment of our experience.

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How to Study the Dharma

How to Study the Dharma

In Buddhism, an ever-deepening understanding unfolds naturally from intellectual study. This process is classically expressed in the teaching of the three prajnas, or kinds of knowledge—hearing, contemplating and meditating.

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Good Cause

Good Cause

““When we understand how our mind works, the practice becomes easy.” Reginald A. Ray discusses the close connection between Buddhist philosophy and practice.

Reginald A. Ray discusses the close connection between Buddhist philosophy and practice.”

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Books that Burn

Books that Burn

The Practice and Philosophy of the Buddhist Path by Reginald Ray| January 1, 2004 | Lion's Roar According to Reginald Ray,...

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That Problematic “Self”

That Problematic “Self”

“Self” is a purely conceptual construction says Dr. Reginald A. Ray in his fourth and final article exploring the “self.” He says, “What makes one’s ‘self’ so problematic is its degree of isolation from our actual experience, its rigidity and dissonance with reality beyond itself.”

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Deconstructing the ‘Self’

Deconstructing the ‘Self’

If the “self” is ultimately nothing more than a figment of our imagination, what is this figment like and how does it come to seem so real? In the third of four posts on the self, Dr. Reginald “Reggie” Ray breaks it down.

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Why Me?

Why Me?

by Reginald Ray| July 1, 2003 In the second of a four-part series on the definition of “self” in Buddhist teaching,...

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Who, Me?

Who, Me?

by Reginald Ray| May 1, 2003 Buddhism describes several kinds of ‘self’ and ‘not-self,’ each of which has its role to play...

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Kobun Chino’s Trailer

Kobun Chino’s Trailer

by Reginald Ray| November 1, 2002 Reginald Ray writes a remembrance of Zen master and famed calligrapher Kobun Chino Roshi,...

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The Floating Heads

The Floating Heads

by Reginald Ray| September 1, 2002 Many Western Budddhists, says Reginald Ray, perpetuate the mind/body, secular/sacred...

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The Practice of Karma

The Practice of Karma

by Reginald Ray| March 1, 2002 Reginald A. Ray on how T’hrinlay Wangmo transformed an horrific incident into a situation of...

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Understanding Karma

Understanding Karma

by Reginald Ray Everything we do affects the future in ever-widening ripples of cause and effect. If our actions are...

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Religion Without God

Religion Without God

Buddhists everywhere believe in an “unseen world” inhabited by a full range of gods, demi-gods, spirits, ghosts and demons. In addition, all Buddhists-except, perhaps, modern Western ones-pray continually to buddhas, bodhisattvas and great teachers not only for inspiration, but for practical guidance and help.

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What is Tibetan Buddhism?

What is Tibetan Buddhism?

In Tibet, Buddhism provided the basis of a unique civilization. It offered a vision of a meaningful life, an ethical system that enjoined decency and humanity, a profound philosophical tradition, and a comprehensive spiritual path. The expressions of Buddhism in Tibet could be found everywhere-in the devotion of virtually all Tibetans for their religion; in the multitude of small and large monasteries scattered throughout the country; in the shrines located in every home, monastery, and retreat cell; in the rituals that shaped and guided everyone’s life; in the ever- present color and vividness of Tibetan painting, sculpture, music, dance, and theater; and even in the government organization and its operation.

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